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Exercise, Nutrition, Opinion, Other, wellness

The Holy Trinity

Health is defined by Miriam Webster as “the condition of being sound in body, mind, and spirit.”

Notice that there is nothing in that definition that relates to your weight, body fat percentage, or the amount that you exercise. Health is so much more than your physical body.

I was discussing this with a good friend of mine, telling him that once I let go of my body hang ups, my body fell into line. He then brought up this concept of the “holy trinity of health.” This is the idea that your physical, mental, and spiritual health are all interconnected, so when they are all being nourished, they all thrive. However, when one aspect of the trinity is off, any of them, this throws you off, and makes it that much harder to nourish the other two. This is a concept I’ve seen to be true, and one I can get behind.

It seemed that when my mind was right, when I was stress free (or as close to that as I can be) and happy, I was much more inclined to take care of myself physically. When you actually want to take care of your physical health, meaning exercising for health and eating more fruits and vegetables, it becomes much easier and more enjoyable to do so. On the other side of the spectrum, when I was very stressed a few weeks ago, the last thing I wanted to do was go to the gym and eat veggies. My body wanted it, but boy did my mind want a Netflix marathon and some cookies. Since my mental aspect was off, it basically gave me permission to neglect my physical health.

Mental and spiritual health are not things that are usually discussed in the realm of health and fitness, but they are just as important as your physical health. Your mental state dictates your physical journey. I’ve discussed the power of positivity before, meaning if you start your journey from a place of love and wanting to improve your health and wellness, this will be a fun and fulfilling journey, with the difficulties being worth it because you want this. If you begin from a place of hatred and wanting to change only the parts of you you hate, this will be a hard journey. It will be a chore, and lead to a temporary fix, rather than a long term lifestyle change.

Think about your why for this journey. If there are inherently negative reasons (“I hate my chubby tummy” or “I want to get rid of these thunder thighs”), flip the script. Change those reasons to “I want to eat more Whole Foods to nourish my body and power through my workouts” or “I want to strengthen my leg muscles”. These reasons say the same thing, but in entirely different ways. Rewriting some of the script in your head is step one to improving your mental and spiritual health, and step one in improving your physical health.

Exercise, fitness, Progress, wellness

Strength Training For Runners

One of the concepts that I repeat over and over is that resistance training will improve (almost) every aspect of your life. Heavy resistance training will increase your overall strength, body composition, bone density, and metabolic rate. But what if you are an endurance athlete? Even if you are a marathon runner, and nothing else (yet), don’t count my teachings out just yet. Supplementing your distance running, or cycling, with heavy resistance training will do nothing but improve your performance in your sport.

Heavy strength training and endurance training could not be more opposite. They are both physical activity that contribute to your overall activity level, but that’s about it. Endurance training and strength training tax two completely different energy systems and muscle types. Endurance training taxes your aerobic energy system, while strength training taxes the anaerobic energy system, either the creatine phosphate (CP) system or the glycolytic energy system. The aerobic energy system kicks in after you have been exercising consistently for over 90 seconds, and allows you to continuously produce energy to be able to fuel the duration of your workout without rest. Anaerobic systems produce powerful energy in short bursts, up to 15 seconds for CP and 15 seconds up to 90 seconds for glycolytic, and require rest to be able to replenish energy sources. As well, endurance training exercises mainly type I muscle fibers. These muscle fibers are full of mitochondria, meaning they are able to continuously supply energy and oxygen, allowing for longer periods of work without fatigue. Strength training mainly works type II muscle fibers. Type II muscle fibers are those most associated with strength and power, and are beneficial for quick bursts of energy before needing to recover. To be a well rounded athlete, whether you are a distance runner or a strength athlete, both energy sources and muscle types should be trained. Sprinters can absolutely benefit from heavy strength training, as both types of training require heavy use of the anaerobic energy systems and type II muscle fibers.

Specifically for endurance athletes, strength training can have many benefits. Heavy resistance training, specifically for the lower body, can help to improve overall running mechanics, as well as muscular balance and strength. Unilateral training, which means training one limb at a time, is one of the best things that you can incorporate into your routine. Training one leg a time can help to improve any muscular imbalances that you have between legs, which helps to improve proper movement patterns. The better you move in general, the less likely you are to encounter an injury during a run. As well, training single legs will improve tendon and ligament strength. This strength will translate into more stable joints, continuing to improve muscular balance, while also helping to reduce your risk of sprains and strains. As well, heavy strength training incorporating both limbs, such as a barbell back or front squat, will help to build up muscle strength, tendon and ligament strength, and bone density. Your bones build up against resistance, so movements where your body is working against gravity, will help to build up the vertical bone density. This newfound muscular strength and bone density, combined with regular endurance training, will help to improve leg strength and elasticity, which will reduce the energy you expend to take a step. You will also be a much lower risk of multiple injuries, include strains and sprains, and shin splints.

Distance running and strength training are not mutually exclusive. When combined for a distance runner, these two forms of training can keep you running longer with a lower risk of injury. Strength training can also help to decrease muscular imbalances that can be exasperated by running. Running can cause overactive quads and hip flexors, while decreasing activation of hamstrings and glutes. Strength training can actively help to even out these imbalances. Though you’re a distance runner, and probably pretty tied to it, don’t count out strength training. It can help improve your running from good to great.

Sample workout for runners:

-Glute activation 2 sets 10 reps

(Lateral walks, Glute kickbacks, donkey kicks)

-Barbell Back Squat (or heavy goblet squat) 4 sets 6 reps

-Weighted Stationary Lunge 4 sets 6 reps

-Single Leg RDL (DB in opposite hand) 3 sets 8 reps/leg

-Single leg calf raises 3 sets 8 reps/leg

Nutrition, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Keep Calm and Drink Ya Water

As Derek Zoolander says, “Water is the essence of wetness. Wetness is the essence of beauty.”

Drinking enough water is probably the easiest, and single most important, thing you can do to improve your health. Why? Well just to begin:

1. Your body is up to 65% water.

2. Your blood is around 90% water.

3. Your brain is around 75% water.

4. Your lungs are around 85% water.

When you see just how much of your body consists of water, it’s much easier to understand why proper hydration is that important. That water keeps everything running smoothly in your body, from dissolving vitamins in your blood for easier absorption to lubrication joints to aiding in muscle recovery. If that’s not enough to convince you to up your water intake, there’s more.

Proper hydration can also be crucial to weight loss and management.

First, keeping yourself properly hydrated means that your body is running at it’s best, allowing you to have the best performance in workouts that you can. It also means that your brain is functioning well, keeping irrational thoughts at bay (hello, “i had one cookie so this means I’ve failed and I’m going to eat the whole package and be a failure forever.” That’s much harder to think when you aren’t dehydrated.) Even dehydration of just 2% leads to decrease in physical and mental performance, leading to you feeling lethargic and a bit irrational.

Second, the cue for thirst is most often mistaken for hunger. This means that when you are actually thirsty, you may be reaching for snacks that you don’t actually need. Staying hydrated means you most likely get that thirst signal in the first place, so if you get a hunger pang, you’re most likely in need of some calories.

Third, water keeps you full! You can’t abuse this one, but when you have a belly full of water, it’s hard to overeat. I tell clients to start each meal with a big glass of water. Not only does this help them reach their hydration goals, but it helps to prevent overeating.

Last, water has zero calories. Replacing a soda or juice with a water of the same size can save a ton of sugar and between 100-200 calories. Add all of those calories up throughout the day, and water can be the difference between you hitting your goal or not.

Now that the reasons for drinking water are laid out, the question is now “How Much?” There is actually no universal standard for how much water to consume. It used to be 8 8oz glasses, which is still better than nothing, but water intake is also based on your size, how active you are, how much you sweat, etc. The best rule of thumb there is right now is to drink .5-1 ounce of water for each pound of bodyweight. This means that the intake for a 150lb person would be between 75 and 150oz.

The best tips i can give you for water consumption, especially if you haven’t been drinking nearly enough is just to start.

• Drink an extra glass of water daily

• Buy a refillable (BPA Free!) water bottle to refill all day long

• Drink a glass of water before each meal

• Drink a glass right after you wake up

• Replace one sugary drink with a glass of water

• Use crystal light or MIO drops to flavor water if you need to

Exercise, fitness, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Ready, Set, Goal

Today is the last day of 2018 (we made it, woo!), and tomorrow is the day. The day that you have decided will be the day that you become the person you want to be, and do the things you want to do. Goodbye you of yesteryear, and hello new and improved 2019 you!

I don’t know about you, but I have some HUGE goals for 2019, most that are too big to work towards right off the bat. Why do I say that? Because I like to feel like I’m accomplishing things, as I’m sure you do too. Only working towards my overall goal, and not accomplishing even close to all of it by the end of the month? That’s pretty discouraging. But it’s not my fault, and not yours either if that happens to you. The fault was in your goal, not in yourself. The first step to success, in any journey, is to make sure that your goals set you up for success. These goals need to be as helpful as possible, and they need to be SMART.

*Specific – Make sure your goal is actually specific. Losing weight is a good goal, but losing 15lbs of body fat is an even better goal. This sets us up for an actual number goal, to ensure we’re making progress towards it, and also includes that we want to lose body fat, not just any mass (including muscle).

*Measurable – We want to make sure we can actually measure our goal. A specific goal is usually one that can be measured and tracked. Seeing the physical evidence of progress towards an overall goal can help with both motivation and adherence to the goal.

*Attainable – Make sure your goal is something that can actually be achieved. A goal to lose 50lbs and 10% body fat is a great goal, it is both specific and measurable. However, if we decide the deadline is four weeks to achieve this goal goal, it now becomes unattainable. (Or if you can attain it, it won’t be sustainable). An unattainable goal sets you up for failure before you even start.

*Realistic – This also can be “results based”. Make sure your goal is realistic. This goes hand in hand with attainable. A goal that gives you no chance to reach from the beginning will not help you reach it. It is much better to make multiple, smaller milestone type goals. This will keep your motivation elevated, as you reach smaller goals more often, on your way to the overall goal.

*Time Sensitive – Give yourself a deadline! This goes along with each of the previous attributes of a successful goal, but give yourself a time table to reach your goal, as long as that deadline is realistic. This will again keep that motivation high, as you strive to hit the goal by your deadline. Again, smaller goals with deadlines that approach more quickly, with deadlines every couple of weeks or months, can help keep that drive. This allows you continuously hit goals, rather than feeling like you might never hit your overall goal.

If you write down your goals, and they don’t hit all of the SMART points, there’s no problem with reworking them a bit. The most common goal mistake I come across is too much too soon. This means that your goal is your overall goal, making it not so attainable. All you have to do is take a step back. Think about what steps you need to accomplish to hit that overall goal. What’s the first step? Boom. There’s your goal. I find it most helpful to take my overall goal and work backwards, in there I find my actual, SMART goals.

Set yourself up for success, make sure your 2019 goals are SMART.

Exercise, fitness, Nutrition, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Holiday Wellness

Wellness Tips for the Holiday Season:

1: Do what you want to do. If you love your family and want to spend the season with them, do so. If your family stresses you out, and being with them isn’t what’s best for you, don’t feel pressured to. Your mental health is more important, so do what’s best for you.

2: Enjoy your holiday. (Close to Tip One, but slightly different.) The holiday season is the end of your year, and you should enjoy it. Of course, keep your physical and mental health in mind, but feel free to indulge a bit. Go out for drinks with friends, share a dessert you’ve been meaning to try, blow off your friends and look at Christmas decorations, whatever you want to do, do it.

3: Don’t worry about your diet. Enjoy the food of the season! Don’t go nuts, but make sure that you aren’t neglecting your life in the name of “health”. Remember: veggies are full of vitamins and minerals, not just “low cal options” and exercise is there to enhance your health, not to punish you for eating and drinking too much the night before.

4: Try to stick to your routine. This can be a hard one, depending on your holiday plans, but do your best to stick to what you do daily. Just because you’re on vacation and relaxing doesn’t mean you should neglect all of the habits you’ve worked so hard to form! If your schedule allows, try to get the same amount of exercise in, even if it means three 20 minute walks around the neighborhood instead of three days in the gym. Staying active will only help translate into your new year.

5: Reflect on your year. This time of year can be hard for us, whether financially or emotionally. Make sure, even if you feel like you’re struggling, that you give yourself credit where credit is due. Reflect back on your year, and on your accomplishments and successes. Reflect on your not so big successes, but the lessons learned from them and not the negative feelings. No matter how your year went, let’s focus on the positives, and the lessons we can implement in the next year.

Enjoy your holidays, wherever you decide to and with whomever you decide to. This was all around a rough year for a lot of us, so be sure to give yourself a chance to relax, reflect, and get a game plan for next year. Happy holidays everyone!

Exercise, fitness, Progress, wellness

Bump It Up

How have your workouts been lately? Are they still really challenging, or have the once challenging lifts become easier? As you continue to perform a workout, exercise, or movement in general, your body and muscles adapt to the movement, becoming stronger, and making the movement easier. In order to grow muscle size, endurance, strength, or stability, the intensity must be increased past the point of adaptation. This is a principle in fitness known as Progressive Overload. There are many ways to easily increase the intensity of your lifts to ensure that you are making sufficient progress from them.

Increase the Weight

The easiest way to increase the intensity of any movement is to increase the weight used. How do you know that it’s time to increase the weight? Let’s talk about the 2 for 2 rule. This rule states that when you feel as though you could do extra reps in each set, from the last two workouts, it’s time to increase the weight. This ensures that you won’t be increasing weight prematurely, or before your body is actually ready. To reduce the risk of injury, you should be sure to gradually increase the weight, with no more than a 2.5-5lb increase on upper body movements, and a 5-10lb increase on lower body movements.

Increase the Volume

Another easy way to increase the intensity of your workouts is to increase the volume of exercise you perform in the workout. Volume refers to the total amount of sets and repetitions of movements in a workout. To increase the intensity, you could increase the amount of sets by one (two to three sets, three to four, etc) or you could also increase the amount of repetitions you perform (12 instead of 10, 6 instead of 4, etc). I would not increase both the sets and repetitions at the same time though, as this may increase the intensity too much too quickly, with little time for adaptation. If you decide to increase the repetitions, be sure that it is still within your intended range, so as not to change the intent of the lift. This means to keep the range within 8-15 for hypertrophy, 1-6 for strength, and 15+ for endurance.

SuperSet for Super Gains

Instead of performing a straight set, of three sets of 10 repetitions of an exercise with a one minute rest in between sets, try to superset two exercises. This means combining two exercises into a single set, by performing all reps of exercise One and then all reps of exercise Two with no rest in-between. You rest after all reps of both exercises are complete. Increasing the amount of work without increasing the amount of rest will increase heart rate, breathing rate, and the amount of stress placed on muscles. You can either combine two similar exercises, such as a squat and a lunge, to really stress your leg muscles, increasing the volume and intensity placed on those muscles, or you can combine two opposing muscles, such as with a row and a bench press, working back and chest. This type of superset allows for more work to be done with less rest in between, as the rest period for one muscle group occurs when you are performing the repetitions for the second muscle group. For pure strength gains, I perform straight sets, with no second exercise, as the rest time for those lifts are two-three minutes. After I have performed my strength lifts, I then superset lifts for an increased intensity, and stress on the muscles to make them grow.

Between these three variables, it is very easy to increase the intensity of your workouts. Remember, without proper intensity, your muscle size and strength won’t increase, as they don’t have the proper stress to stimulate the adaptations. What would be the point of working out if you weren’t actually gaining anything from it? Each workout should be difficult and challenging, giving your body the necessary stress to progress.

Nutrition, Opinion, Other

The Breakfast Club

Breakfast is my absolute favorite meal of the day. You want cake? Here’s a breakfast food for that. Want something more savory? Here ya go. Fries? We call them homefries here. Leftovers? Don’t worry about heating them up, they are, somehow, better cold in the morning.

It’s been called the most important meal of the day, and even a miracle for weight loss, yet it’s the meal most usually skipped. Don’t get fooled by weight loss mags, breakfast is no miracle. It’s not going to “jumpstart” your metabolism, but it is very useful if you want to indulge in it. Breakfast is a great way to energize yourself in the morning, giving your body the nutrients and calories it needs to get you through your daily activities. It doesn’t necessarily “jumpstart” your metabolism, but it does allow your body to continue running efficiently, since it has the necessary calories. As well, breakfast can prevent overeating at later meals. Think about the last time you went nuts on some food. How hungry were you? Probably pretty ravenous. Think about how long you went in between meals that day. It was probably a pretty long time. The main culprit behind overeating, especially at night, is eating too little during the day. Your body is smart, it knows how many calories it needs. If you think that skipping breakfast is a way to cut calories, you may be more than making up for it at night.

Even with all these benefits, breakfast is still skipped like it’s cardio. There is no need to have breakfast, it can be very helpful as i said above, but it isn’t necessary. Intermittent Fasting is a nutrition style where you fast for longer periods and eat all of your calories in a shorter window of time (around 8 hours). This works for some people, and that’s great. I’m not a huge fan of it, but if it works, go for it. The number one reason why people skip breakfast is because of a lack of time. I get it, your mornings are crazy busy (and you want to sleep as long as possible and cooking really gets in the way of that.) Some people just can’t eat in the mornings, their bodies just don’t enjoy it, and that’s fine. But you still need some food in the morning (just maybe not when you first wake up).

Enter: Breakfast Prep, the easiest meal prep you will ever find. I have three go-to recipes for breakfasts on the go that are easy to make, healthy, and delicious. Don’t believe me? Read the recipes below. Easy. Peasy.

Overnight Oats

1/2 cup oats

1/4 cup vanilla Greek yogurt

1/2 cup milk

1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey for sweetness

Whatever toppings you’d like! (I like cocoa powder and peanut butter)

Optional: 1 tbsp chia seeds to thicken extra

1: Mix together all ingredients in a container

2: Refrigerate overnight.

At Home McMuffins

1 English Muffin

1 egg

1 slice Canadian bacon (or ham, sausage, bacon, whatever you’d like)

1 slice cheese

1: Cook egg. (If making multiple sandwiches at once, crack eggs into greased muffin tins and and bake for 15-18 minutes at 350. The easiest.)

2: Place cooked egg on bottom half of English muffin.

3: Layer ham and cheese (or whatever toppings you chose) on top of egg

4: Wait for eggs to cool completely, then wrap sandwiches and refrigerate or freeze.

5: Microwave to heat when ready.

Protein Pancakes

1 scoop protein powder

1 egg

2 tablespoons flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

Up to 1/4 cup of water for consistency

1: Mix together all dry ingredients

2: Add egg and water

3: Mix

4: Heat skillet over medium heat

5: Divide batter into three equal pancakes in skillet

6: Cook until bubbles form on the surface and flip

7: Cook until done through and top with syrup (I use sugar free)