Exercise, fitness, health, Nutrition, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Do What You Can

Motivation is the absolute worst. It’s your drive to accomplish tasks, your drive to do better, and can be your main deciding factor in habits. Motivation is amazing when it’s present, but a total pain in the ass when it’s absent. That’s the thing, it’s never a constant. One day it’s up, one day it’s down, sometimes it stays for week, and sometimes it leaves for months. Dealing with the absence of motivation can be one of the most difficult things to overcome in life. And spoiler alert: it doesn’t get any easier.

Trying to accomplish anything when you’re unmotivated is like trying to shove a circle into a square opening. It won’t get done, and you’re going to frustrate the hell out of yourself trying. You all know me by now, you know what I’m about. I’m about listening to your body and your mind and doing what feels right for you in the moment. Except for when it comes to motivation. If you rely on motivation to accomplish everything in your life, you’re going to be real annoyed after a while. Like I said above, when you’re motivated, life is great. You feel like you can do everything, like you’re on top of the world and can create a new one. But what happens once that motivation leaves? You can’t just lay down and wait for it to come back. Will you work with the same ferocity that you had while you were motivated? Probably not. Can you still progress during times of less motivation? Absolutely.

There are some projects that you undertake that require inspiration. When the inspiration strikes, you’re on a roll. You’re creating left and right, and when that inspiration leaves, it can be devastating on progress. That’s not the case for everything in life. Even without motivation and inspiration, you still need to live your life. Healthy habits and actions tend to fall back during these lulls in motivation, but that’s the last thing we want to happen. Health, fitness, and wellness thrive on consistency. They don’t really care that you aren’t feeling it today, all that matters is whether you complete the task or not. So what do we do in this situation? We do what we can.

Even in the lulls, simply completing a task can help to pull you through it, and even help pull you out. You don’t need to give 150% in this time, you just need to give 100% of what you got today, even if that’s only about 50%. A good rule of thumb is that when motivation lacks, discipline takes over. That’s why establishing these healthy habits is so damn important to your success. When you don’t feel like working out, when you aren’t motivated, what gets you to the gym? It’s obviously not motivation, but it’s discipline to continue with the habit. It’s intrinsic motivation to achieve your goal, even when you’re overall motivation lacks.

I’m not here to tell you that you’re always going to be motivated. I’m not going to give you tips and tricks to stay motivated, because even when you try your hardest to keep it around, you will lose it at some point. The main thing to remember, especially when the last thing you want to do is what you’re supposed to, is that doing something is better than nothing. Doing what you can will keep you more on track than giving up. Don’t let your motivation be anything more than extra drive. Let it carry you through the waves of inspiration and drive, but don’t let the lack of it ground and halt you. Motivation is a tricky, tricky thing, and don’t rely on it to move any mountains. Do what you can, carry some stones, and keep going.

Exercise, fitness, health, Nutrition, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Creatures of Habit

Habit (noun): a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.

We all have habits in our lives, most commonly known as our “routines.” You know your routine, those steps you take each day, almost without even thinking about it.

• Morning coffee

• Snacks after dinner

• Leaving for work at the same time each morning

• Brushing your teeth

• Washing your face

These habits did not take much to instill into you, and it might even be hard to think back to when they started, as they have always been a habit. Habits can be our greatest strengths or our downfalls, depending on the habits themselves. A habit of hitting the gym on your drive home from work is a great way to ensure you get your activity in, brushing your teeth twice a day is crucial to dental health, and going to bed at the same time each night makes sure you get enough sleep. However, habits such as mindlessly snacking in front of the tv, or having a few beers with friends, and pizza with your beers, can be pretty rough on your overall health. Doing these actions a few times, even once or twice a week, is one thing, but them being habitual can be detrimental to your health.

Maybe you have some goals for healthy habits for your life. Maybe you’d like to hit the gym three times a week, or maybe even just drinking a glass of water right when you wake up (so good for your digestive system, and helps to rehydrate you after sleeping all night. Highly recommend). No matter what the habit is, the way to get there is the same.

Step One: Create a goal using the SMART method of goal setting (found here)

Step Two: perform the action once.

Step Three: repeat the action for at least 21 days

Step Four: keep repeating the action for at least 6 weeks

It takes at the minimum 21 days of consistency for an action to become a habit. The “21 day rule” came into effect Dr. Maltz, a plastic surgeon in the 50s, noticed it took 21 days for his patients to get used to seeing their new looks. He then noticed it took 21 days for him to put a new habit in place. The problem is, after 21 days, it’s not a settled, automatic action yet. Once you’ve hit the 21 day mark, the action is integrated into your routine, which makes you remember to do it more, but, at this point, you still have to consciously make the effort to perform the action.

According to the American Council on Exercise (ACE), and their health coach certification that I hold, it takes at least 6 weeks of performing an action consistently for it to be a settled part of your routine. Once you have been performing this action for 6 weeks, it will be extremely hard to give up, making it a part of your every day life.

Habits can take time to form properly, and can be a tedious process as each habit requires its own process to form. The payoff from creating these healthy habits, in the correct way, can be incredibly important to your long term health success. Pick an action you want to incorporate, and get to habit forming. One day at a time, one step at a time, one habit at a time.

It doesn’t matter how slow you go, as long as you don’t stop.”

Exercise, fitness, health, Nutrition, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Health and Fitness?

Health: “the condition of being sound in mind, body, and spirit.”

Fitness: “the ability to carry out tasks without undue fatigue.”

Health and fitness are always intertwined everywhere you see, with fitness magazines giving you general health tips and health magazines giving you some fitness tips. This isn’t a super weird concept, considering their are very much related. But where does the line stop? Where does the connection between health and fitness end, and what’s the difference?

Health and fitness are incredibly related topics. Without health, there is no need for fitness. Without needing to have a sound body, one free of ailments or disease, there would be no need for physical fitness. Especially considering the technology we are blessed (or cursed) with today, the ability for your body to carry out difficult and strenuous tasks wouldn’t really be necessary, as I’m sure there’s a machine for that. Physical activity helps to grow and maintain muscle mass needed for overall body stability and strength, reducing the risk of osteoporosis; it helps to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as keeping your brain healthy and reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia. Staying physically fit and active also helps to increase your day to day energy and stamina, providing you with the energy you need to do all the activities you want, keeping your mind happy. In these ways, physical fitness is crucial to health.

Where health and fitness clash is in the media and in the fitness industry. Both of these platforms describe an extreme level of fitness being vital to health. Extreme fitness, with very low body fat percentages, hours in the gym, and fad diets and food restriction, is almost the exact opposite of health. Your body may look great, but remember: health is more than just your physical appearance. When you attain such a low body fat, you sacrifice certain aspects of a normal life. You sacrifice the freedom to go out and eat with friends on the weekend because you’re on a diet, or at the gym. You sacrifice energy to go about your day, as the diet you need to be on for that low of a body fat will be very low calorie. You sacrifice comfort, as body fat helps to insulate your body, as well as help provide you with energy. Glamorizing this level of fitness is not healthy, and does not relate to health, as it actively decreases all areas of health.

Even as someone who works out more days out of the week than not, I am not in the extreme category. I value my mental health and spiritual health, as well as my physical health, so I ensure I have a healthy balance of the three. I work out because it’s what I enjoy doing. It makes me feel strong and confident, helps to keep my heart healthy, and allows me to indulge with my friends without panic of gaining weight or becoming “unhealthy.” I have been on the extreme end of the fitness spectrum, and I was miserable. I assumed getting as “fit” as possible would make me happy and accept myself, but all it did was make my mental health worse.

The unfortunate part, is that the extreme is what the general public associates with the word “fitness.” Fitness is no longer about the ability to do activities without strain, but now it is the ability to be the most muscular and the leanest person in the gym. Fitness is absolutely not an all or nothing type of thing, you can workout out casually and eat relatively healthy most of the time, and still be fit and healthy. It’s not an extreme sport, and it’s not a competition. More is not always better. Taking care of yourself physically is only a benefit as long as it is also benefiting your mental and spiritual health with it. If you are sacrificing your health for the sake of your fitness, it’s time to re-evaluate your goals and actions.

Being fit does not automatically mean that you are healthy.

Being healthy does not automatically mean that you look like a fitness professional.

Find a balance of your physical, mental, and spiritual health to be in your best “shape.”