Exercise, fitness, health, Nutrition, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Do What You Can

Motivation is the absolute worst. It’s your drive to accomplish tasks, your drive to do better, and can be your main deciding factor in habits. Motivation is amazing when it’s present, but a total pain in the ass when it’s absent. That’s the thing, it’s never a constant. One day it’s up, one day it’s down, sometimes it stays for week, and sometimes it leaves for months. Dealing with the absence of motivation can be one of the most difficult things to overcome in life. And spoiler alert: it doesn’t get any easier.

Trying to accomplish anything when you’re unmotivated is like trying to shove a circle into a square opening. It won’t get done, and you’re going to frustrate the hell out of yourself trying. You all know me by now, you know what I’m about. I’m about listening to your body and your mind and doing what feels right for you in the moment. Except for when it comes to motivation. If you rely on motivation to accomplish everything in your life, you’re going to be real annoyed after a while. Like I said above, when you’re motivated, life is great. You feel like you can do everything, like you’re on top of the world and can create a new one. But what happens once that motivation leaves? You can’t just lay down and wait for it to come back. Will you work with the same ferocity that you had while you were motivated? Probably not. Can you still progress during times of less motivation? Absolutely.

There are some projects that you undertake that require inspiration. When the inspiration strikes, you’re on a roll. You’re creating left and right, and when that inspiration leaves, it can be devastating on progress. That’s not the case for everything in life. Even without motivation and inspiration, you still need to live your life. Healthy habits and actions tend to fall back during these lulls in motivation, but that’s the last thing we want to happen. Health, fitness, and wellness thrive on consistency. They don’t really care that you aren’t feeling it today, all that matters is whether you complete the task or not. So what do we do in this situation? We do what we can.

Even in the lulls, simply completing a task can help to pull you through it, and even help pull you out. You don’t need to give 150% in this time, you just need to give 100% of what you got today, even if that’s only about 50%. A good rule of thumb is that when motivation lacks, discipline takes over. That’s why establishing these healthy habits is so damn important to your success. When you don’t feel like working out, when you aren’t motivated, what gets you to the gym? It’s obviously not motivation, but it’s discipline to continue with the habit. It’s intrinsic motivation to achieve your goal, even when you’re overall motivation lacks.

I’m not here to tell you that you’re always going to be motivated. I’m not going to give you tips and tricks to stay motivated, because even when you try your hardest to keep it around, you will lose it at some point. The main thing to remember, especially when the last thing you want to do is what you’re supposed to, is that doing something is better than nothing. Doing what you can will keep you more on track than giving up. Don’t let your motivation be anything more than extra drive. Let it carry you through the waves of inspiration and drive, but don’t let the lack of it ground and halt you. Motivation is a tricky, tricky thing, and don’t rely on it to move any mountains. Do what you can, carry some stones, and keep going.

Opinion, Progress, wellness

Change is For the Better

“The art of progress is to preserve order amid change and to preserve change amid order.” – Alfred North Whitehead

There comes a point in life, everyone’s life, where you go through a change. This could be a small change, like a haircut, or a much larger change, like a total career switch. No matter the degree of change, we all go through it. Change is one of the only constants we have.

Change is not easy. As humans, we are creatures of habit and routine, enjoying our comfort zones. The problem with the comfort zone is that you will never grow inside of it. No one has ever progressed from doing the same thing over and over. That’s actually the definition of insanity: doing the same thing over and over, and expecting different results. In order to grow, and achieve something you never have before, you need to go do something you’ve never done before. Knowing all of this doesn’t make the process of change any easier.

Recently, in the past year or so, my whole life has changed. My view of health, fitness, the fitness industry in general, and what it means to be healthy have taken a total 180. Before, my job as a fitness professional meant changing my client’s physical appearances. Now, my job as a fitness professional is to use healthy habits and fitness as tools to change their physical and mental health for the better, with a physical change being an added benefit. I realized that, without your mind being healthy and happy, your body will never be healthy and happy. This threw me for a damn loop. Imagine working for years towards a certain goal and, in the span of a few weeks, turning around and going in another direction. It is scary. It’s scary to not really know my new terrain. It’s what I’m passionate about, but a whole new world to me. However, to start a new subset of health and fitness, I need to put myself out there and show people what it is all about. I have to venture into the great unknown in order to keep growing.

The only mistake we can make when it comes to change is resisting it. Like I stated above, change is the only constant we have in life. To resist change, to resist the world pointing you in a new direction, is to resist growth itself. No one wants to stay the same. We are constantly after the next best thing, the next big thing. How do you expect to become the next big thing, if you refuse to change any aspect of you? The best thing you can do with change (and believe me, this is way easier said than done) is to embrace it. You’re allowed to struggle with it, you’re allowed to be nervous and scared, and you’re allowed to panic. What you aren’t allowed to do, in my mind, is resist. Embrace the change. Embrace what the change can bring to you. Embrace what your life could be after the change.

Exercise, fitness, health, Nutrition, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Creatures of Habit

Habit (noun): a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.

We all have habits in our lives, most commonly known as our “routines.” You know your routine, those steps you take each day, almost without even thinking about it.

• Morning coffee

• Snacks after dinner

• Leaving for work at the same time each morning

• Brushing your teeth

• Washing your face

These habits did not take much to instill into you, and it might even be hard to think back to when they started, as they have always been a habit. Habits can be our greatest strengths or our downfalls, depending on the habits themselves. A habit of hitting the gym on your drive home from work is a great way to ensure you get your activity in, brushing your teeth twice a day is crucial to dental health, and going to bed at the same time each night makes sure you get enough sleep. However, habits such as mindlessly snacking in front of the tv, or having a few beers with friends, and pizza with your beers, can be pretty rough on your overall health. Doing these actions a few times, even once or twice a week, is one thing, but them being habitual can be detrimental to your health.

Maybe you have some goals for healthy habits for your life. Maybe you’d like to hit the gym three times a week, or maybe even just drinking a glass of water right when you wake up (so good for your digestive system, and helps to rehydrate you after sleeping all night. Highly recommend). No matter what the habit is, the way to get there is the same.

Step One: Create a goal using the SMART method of goal setting (found here)

Step Two: perform the action once.

Step Three: repeat the action for at least 21 days

Step Four: keep repeating the action for at least 6 weeks

It takes at the minimum 21 days of consistency for an action to become a habit. The “21 day rule” came into effect Dr. Maltz, a plastic surgeon in the 50s, noticed it took 21 days for his patients to get used to seeing their new looks. He then noticed it took 21 days for him to put a new habit in place. The problem is, after 21 days, it’s not a settled, automatic action yet. Once you’ve hit the 21 day mark, the action is integrated into your routine, which makes you remember to do it more, but, at this point, you still have to consciously make the effort to perform the action.

According to the American Council on Exercise (ACE), and their health coach certification that I hold, it takes at least 6 weeks of performing an action consistently for it to be a settled part of your routine. Once you have been performing this action for 6 weeks, it will be extremely hard to give up, making it a part of your every day life.

Habits can take time to form properly, and can be a tedious process as each habit requires its own process to form. The payoff from creating these healthy habits, in the correct way, can be incredibly important to your long term health success. Pick an action you want to incorporate, and get to habit forming. One day at a time, one step at a time, one habit at a time.

It doesn’t matter how slow you go, as long as you don’t stop.”

Exercise, fitness, health, Nutrition, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Health and Fitness?

Health: “the condition of being sound in mind, body, and spirit.”

Fitness: “the ability to carry out tasks without undue fatigue.”

Health and fitness are always intertwined everywhere you see, with fitness magazines giving you general health tips and health magazines giving you some fitness tips. This isn’t a super weird concept, considering their are very much related. But where does the line stop? Where does the connection between health and fitness end, and what’s the difference?

Health and fitness are incredibly related topics. Without health, there is no need for fitness. Without needing to have a sound body, one free of ailments or disease, there would be no need for physical fitness. Especially considering the technology we are blessed (or cursed) with today, the ability for your body to carry out difficult and strenuous tasks wouldn’t really be necessary, as I’m sure there’s a machine for that. Physical activity helps to grow and maintain muscle mass needed for overall body stability and strength, reducing the risk of osteoporosis; it helps to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as keeping your brain healthy and reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia. Staying physically fit and active also helps to increase your day to day energy and stamina, providing you with the energy you need to do all the activities you want, keeping your mind happy. In these ways, physical fitness is crucial to health.

Where health and fitness clash is in the media and in the fitness industry. Both of these platforms describe an extreme level of fitness being vital to health. Extreme fitness, with very low body fat percentages, hours in the gym, and fad diets and food restriction, is almost the exact opposite of health. Your body may look great, but remember: health is more than just your physical appearance. When you attain such a low body fat, you sacrifice certain aspects of a normal life. You sacrifice the freedom to go out and eat with friends on the weekend because you’re on a diet, or at the gym. You sacrifice energy to go about your day, as the diet you need to be on for that low of a body fat will be very low calorie. You sacrifice comfort, as body fat helps to insulate your body, as well as help provide you with energy. Glamorizing this level of fitness is not healthy, and does not relate to health, as it actively decreases all areas of health.

Even as someone who works out more days out of the week than not, I am not in the extreme category. I value my mental health and spiritual health, as well as my physical health, so I ensure I have a healthy balance of the three. I work out because it’s what I enjoy doing. It makes me feel strong and confident, helps to keep my heart healthy, and allows me to indulge with my friends without panic of gaining weight or becoming “unhealthy.” I have been on the extreme end of the fitness spectrum, and I was miserable. I assumed getting as “fit” as possible would make me happy and accept myself, but all it did was make my mental health worse.

The unfortunate part, is that the extreme is what the general public associates with the word “fitness.” Fitness is no longer about the ability to do activities without strain, but now it is the ability to be the most muscular and the leanest person in the gym. Fitness is absolutely not an all or nothing type of thing, you can workout out casually and eat relatively healthy most of the time, and still be fit and healthy. It’s not an extreme sport, and it’s not a competition. More is not always better. Taking care of yourself physically is only a benefit as long as it is also benefiting your mental and spiritual health with it. If you are sacrificing your health for the sake of your fitness, it’s time to re-evaluate your goals and actions.

Being fit does not automatically mean that you are healthy.

Being healthy does not automatically mean that you look like a fitness professional.

Find a balance of your physical, mental, and spiritual health to be in your best “shape.”

Exercise, Nutrition, Opinion, Other, wellness

The Holy Trinity

Health is defined by Miriam Webster as “the condition of being sound in body, mind, and spirit.”

Notice that there is nothing in that definition that relates to your weight, body fat percentage, or the amount that you exercise. Health is so much more than your physical body.

I was discussing this with a good friend of mine, telling him that once I let go of my body hang ups, my body fell into line. He then brought up this concept of the “holy trinity of health.” This is the idea that your physical, mental, and spiritual health are all interconnected, so when they are all being nourished, they all thrive. However, when one aspect of the trinity is off, any of them, this throws you off, and makes it that much harder to nourish the other two. This is a concept I’ve seen to be true, and one I can get behind.

It seemed that when my mind was right, when I was stress free (or as close to that as I can be) and happy, I was much more inclined to take care of myself physically. When you actually want to take care of your physical health, meaning exercising for health and eating more fruits and vegetables, it becomes much easier and more enjoyable to do so. On the other side of the spectrum, when I was very stressed a few weeks ago, the last thing I wanted to do was go to the gym and eat veggies. My body wanted it, but boy did my mind want a Netflix marathon and some cookies. Since my mental aspect was off, it basically gave me permission to neglect my physical health.

Mental and spiritual health are not things that are usually discussed in the realm of health and fitness, but they are just as important as your physical health. Your mental state dictates your physical journey. I’ve discussed the power of positivity before, meaning if you start your journey from a place of love and wanting to improve your health and wellness, this will be a fun and fulfilling journey, with the difficulties being worth it because you want this. If you begin from a place of hatred and wanting to change only the parts of you you hate, this will be a hard journey. It will be a chore, and lead to a temporary fix, rather than a long term lifestyle change.

Think about your why for this journey. If there are inherently negative reasons (“I hate my chubby tummy” or “I want to get rid of these thunder thighs”), flip the script. Change those reasons to “I want to eat more Whole Foods to nourish my body and power through my workouts” or “I want to strengthen my leg muscles”. These reasons say the same thing, but in entirely different ways. Rewriting some of the script in your head is step one to improving your mental and spiritual health, and step one in improving your physical health.

Nutrition, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Keep Calm and Drink Ya Water

As Derek Zoolander says, “Water is the essence of wetness. Wetness is the essence of beauty.”

Drinking enough water is probably the easiest, and single most important, thing you can do to improve your health. Why? Well just to begin:

1. Your body is up to 65% water.

2. Your blood is around 90% water.

3. Your brain is around 75% water.

4. Your lungs are around 85% water.

When you see just how much of your body consists of water, it’s much easier to understand why proper hydration is that important. That water keeps everything running smoothly in your body, from dissolving vitamins in your blood for easier absorption to lubrication joints to aiding in muscle recovery. If that’s not enough to convince you to up your water intake, there’s more.

Proper hydration can also be crucial to weight loss and management.

First, keeping yourself properly hydrated means that your body is running at it’s best, allowing you to have the best performance in workouts that you can. It also means that your brain is functioning well, keeping irrational thoughts at bay (hello, “i had one cookie so this means I’ve failed and I’m going to eat the whole package and be a failure forever.” That’s much harder to think when you aren’t dehydrated.) Even dehydration of just 2% leads to decrease in physical and mental performance, leading to you feeling lethargic and a bit irrational.

Second, the cue for thirst is most often mistaken for hunger. This means that when you are actually thirsty, you may be reaching for snacks that you don’t actually need. Staying hydrated means you most likely get that thirst signal in the first place, so if you get a hunger pang, you’re most likely in need of some calories.

Third, water keeps you full! You can’t abuse this one, but when you have a belly full of water, it’s hard to overeat. I tell clients to start each meal with a big glass of water. Not only does this help them reach their hydration goals, but it helps to prevent overeating.

Last, water has zero calories. Replacing a soda or juice with a water of the same size can save a ton of sugar and between 100-200 calories. Add all of those calories up throughout the day, and water can be the difference between you hitting your goal or not.

Now that the reasons for drinking water are laid out, the question is now “How Much?” There is actually no universal standard for how much water to consume. It used to be 8 8oz glasses, which is still better than nothing, but water intake is also based on your size, how active you are, how much you sweat, etc. The best rule of thumb there is right now is to drink .5-1 ounce of water for each pound of bodyweight. This means that the intake for a 150lb person would be between 75 and 150oz.

The best tips i can give you for water consumption, especially if you haven’t been drinking nearly enough is just to start.

• Drink an extra glass of water daily

• Buy a refillable (BPA Free!) water bottle to refill all day long

• Drink a glass of water before each meal

• Drink a glass right after you wake up

• Replace one sugary drink with a glass of water

• Use crystal light or MIO drops to flavor water if you need to

Exercise, fitness, Opinion, Progress, wellness

Ready, Set, Goal

Today is the last day of 2018 (we made it, woo!), and tomorrow is the day. The day that you have decided will be the day that you become the person you want to be, and do the things you want to do. Goodbye you of yesteryear, and hello new and improved 2019 you!

I don’t know about you, but I have some HUGE goals for 2019, most that are too big to work towards right off the bat. Why do I say that? Because I like to feel like I’m accomplishing things, as I’m sure you do too. Only working towards my overall goal, and not accomplishing even close to all of it by the end of the month? That’s pretty discouraging. But it’s not my fault, and not yours either if that happens to you. The fault was in your goal, not in yourself. The first step to success, in any journey, is to make sure that your goals set you up for success. These goals need to be as helpful as possible, and they need to be SMART.

*Specific – Make sure your goal is actually specific. Losing weight is a good goal, but losing 15lbs of body fat is an even better goal. This sets us up for an actual number goal, to ensure we’re making progress towards it, and also includes that we want to lose body fat, not just any mass (including muscle).

*Measurable – We want to make sure we can actually measure our goal. A specific goal is usually one that can be measured and tracked. Seeing the physical evidence of progress towards an overall goal can help with both motivation and adherence to the goal.

*Attainable – Make sure your goal is something that can actually be achieved. A goal to lose 50lbs and 10% body fat is a great goal, it is both specific and measurable. However, if we decide the deadline is four weeks to achieve this goal goal, it now becomes unattainable. (Or if you can attain it, it won’t be sustainable). An unattainable goal sets you up for failure before you even start.

*Realistic – This also can be “results based”. Make sure your goal is realistic. This goes hand in hand with attainable. A goal that gives you no chance to reach from the beginning will not help you reach it. It is much better to make multiple, smaller milestone type goals. This will keep your motivation elevated, as you reach smaller goals more often, on your way to the overall goal.

*Time Sensitive – Give yourself a deadline! This goes along with each of the previous attributes of a successful goal, but give yourself a time table to reach your goal, as long as that deadline is realistic. This will again keep that motivation high, as you strive to hit the goal by your deadline. Again, smaller goals with deadlines that approach more quickly, with deadlines every couple of weeks or months, can help keep that drive. This allows you continuously hit goals, rather than feeling like you might never hit your overall goal.

If you write down your goals, and they don’t hit all of the SMART points, there’s no problem with reworking them a bit. The most common goal mistake I come across is too much too soon. This means that your goal is your overall goal, making it not so attainable. All you have to do is take a step back. Think about what steps you need to accomplish to hit that overall goal. What’s the first step? Boom. There’s your goal. I find it most helpful to take my overall goal and work backwards, in there I find my actual, SMART goals.

Set yourself up for success, make sure your 2019 goals are SMART.